Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger

Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger

 

Beginning April 4, 2016 - The Montreal Irish Monument Park Foundation (www.montrealirishmonument.com)  is hosting an exhibition, "Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger," for a three (3) week period at the Centaur Theatre - 453 St. François-Xavier, Montreal QC.

See link for a description of the exhibition.

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/New-exhibition-explores-aid-gi...

The traveling exhibit will be presented at various venues in Montreal over the coming year.  Watch this space for a list of locations.

The exhibition tells the story of the religious orders in Montreal whose members gave selflessly to Irish immigrants during the summer of 1847 - their time of greatest need.

Christine Kinealy, founding director of Ireland's Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac and a professor of history, is presenting the exhibition in collaboration with Jason King, Irish Research Council postdoctoral fellow at Moore Institute at Galway University, and the Arnold Bernhard Library.

Many thousands of people fled from Ireland during the Great Hunger and immigrated to Canada. Famine immigrants to Montreal were not only among the poorest of the poor, but many of them arrived already sick with typhus fever. Despite this, a number of people in the English and French Canadian communities provided the ailing and the dying with shelter and support. In the forefront of this compassionate movement were the Sisters of Charity, also known as the Grey Nuns.  

"The story of the Grey Nuns, and of the other religious orders who helped the dying Irish immigrants, is one of kindness, compassion and true charity," Kinealy, founding director of Ireland's Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac and a professor of history,  said. "Nonetheless, almost 6,000 Irish immigrants perished in the fever sheds of Montreal. They had fled from famine in Ireland only to die of fever in Canada. This is a remarkable story that deserves to be better known."

This exhibit is being hosted to help underscore the need to create a suitable memorial at the site of the tragedy.